Bullying: Tips for prevention, limiting impacts

Health Care
Bullied in school
Bullied in school
girl in center of image, seated at her desk in a classroom looking back over her shoulder looking at two girls gossiping about her
In 2017, 20% of U.S. students aged 12-18 reported they had experienced bullying, or physical or verbal aggression that is repeated over a period of time. Approximately 30% admitted to bullying others. (Getty Images)

The beginning of the school year is often filled with excitement. An opportunity to expand learning, meet new people and rekindle relationships that may have faded over the summer months.

For many students, however, returning to the classroom can cause concern or uncertainty.

While the pressures of achieving better grades, demonstrating good behavior and performing well in extracurricular activities can all contribute to increased anxiety and stress in school-aged children, a significant and highly concerning stressor for many youth continues to be the act of bullying, according to Linda Schmidt, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry (child and adolescent psychiatry) in the OHSU School of Medicine, OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital.

The impacts can cause low self-esteem, broad health problems or even suicidal ideation.

In 2017, 20% of U.S. students aged 12-18 reported they had experienced bullying, or physical or verbal aggression that is repeated over a period of time. Approximately 30% admitted to bullying others.

“Anyone can be the victim of bullying; however, the action is oftentimes reserved for socially different individuals or those with lower peer acceptance,” explains Schmidt. “Unfortunately, due to broad access to social media, the act of cyberbullying has expanded such harassment beyond school walls, making it increasingly difficult for children to escape.”

Schmidt recommends the following strategies to identify and limit the impact of potential bullying among school-aged children:

When bullying enters the picture, the key to mitigation is support and understanding, says Schmidt.

“This remains true even for the child who assumes the role of bully. Often times, there is an underlying cause for aggression, such as low self-esteem or general life difficulties. Getting to the root of the issue through calm, supportive discussion can help to increase confidence and diminish disruptive and dangerous behavior,” she says.


Tracy Brawley
Senior Media Relations Specialist
503-494-8231