2017 Total Solar Eclipse

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Total solar eclipse
Total solar eclipse

A clinical photo showing a 28-year-old woman who looked at the sun for an extended period while watching a parachute jump. The patient tried to protect her eye by cupping her hands to create a pinhole effect. Three days later, she noted a central graying and fuzziness of the vision of the right eye, which had been stationary since then. An examination showed a slightly elevated lesion in the macula, a definite central scotoma. Her vision decreased and a year later, the vision in the right eye was 20/40, and there was still a small subretinal scar in the macula of the right eye and a tiny scotoma (not shown). (National Eye Institute)

Total solar eclipse
Total solar eclipse

Diagram of the eye. (National Eye Institute)

Total solar eclipse
Total solar eclipse

Diagram of the eye. (National Eye Institute)

Total solar eclipse
Total solar eclipse

Bailey's Beads effect. (NASA)

Thomas Hwang, M.D.
Thomas Hwang, M.D.

Thomas Hwang, M.D., a retina expert at OHSU Casey Eye Institute and an associate professor of ophthalmology in the OHSU School of Medicine. (OHSU)