Share Tweet Share Email Print

A time to honor those who serve others

OHSU Doernbecher operating room
Ted Saitz, surgery resident (left) works with Casey Seideman, M.D., a pediatric urologist at OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital, March 15, 2017. Like many of the doctors at Oregon's academic medical center, Seideman spends her days seeing patients and providing surgical treatment, all while teaching residents in the urology program. (OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff)

Nearly everyone has interacted with a doctor at some point in their lives. March 30, National Doctors’ Day, is a time to thank those who work to keep us healthy and have dedicated themselves to serving their communities.

The history of the event dates back to 1933. Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, convinced the county auxiliary in Winder, Georgia, to honor local doctors with a formal meal and commemorative cards. They also placed red carnations on the gravesites of phsyicians who had passed away.

The group chose March 30 to commemorate the first use surgical use of anesthesia by Georgia physician Dr. Crawford W. Long.

The annual celebration was picked up and celebrated across the nation, eventually becoming a national day of recognition, when President George W. Bush signed S.J. RES. #366, and encouraged “all Americans to observe this day with appropriate programs and activities.”

OHSU Doernbecher operating room
Casey Seideman, M.D., a pediatric urologist at OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital, says “Every day is different, which is part of the reason I love this job.”  (OHSU/Kristyna Wentz-Graff)

Casey Seideman, M.D., a pediatric urologist at OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital, says “Every day is different, which is part of the reason I love this job.” Like many of the doctors at Oregon's academic medical center, Seideman spends her days seeing patients and providing surgical treatment, all while teaching residents in the urology program.

“The most rewarding part of my job is helping families have a better quality of life. That might mean getting their child out of the hospital faster, reducing pain or fixing a surgical problem. The more quality time the family can spend together outside of the hospital, the better!”

Read more from Seideman’s Q&A interview at OHSU’s Healthy Families blog.

Previous Story Music is medicine in the Doernbecher Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Next Story Taking on the opioid epidemic in Oregon