Senior Media Relations Specialist

Erik Robinson

Senior Media Relations Specialist

503-494-8231

OHSU illuminates opioid epidemic
By Erik Robinson November 13, 2017
A panel of experts highlight the need to reduce stigma and enhance treatment for opioid addiction.
Translational research institute at OHSU receives $37 million
By Erik Robinson September 26, 2017
The Oregon Clinical & Translational Research Institute at OHSU has received a $37 million boost from the federal government to help accelerate the translation of research into clinical use, medical practice and health policy.
Study identifies new target to preserve nerve function
By Erik Robinson July 18, 2017
Scientists in the Vollum Institute at OHSU have identified an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the degeneration of axons, the threadlike portions of a nerve cell that transmit signals within the nervous system.
‘Why do birds sing?’
By Erik Robinson July 11, 2017
Claudio Mello, Ph.D., a professor of behavioral neuroscience in the OHSU School of Medicine who studies zebra finches shares his thoughts about the role of birds in understanding human biology and his growing appreciation for the natural world.
Offering a helping hand
By Erik Robinson July 04, 2017
Using a 3D printer, Albert Chi, M.D. constructed a pair of prosthetic hands for a 6-year-old Astoria boy.
Multiple sclerosis won’t deter OHSU patient from Race Across the West
By Erik Robinson May 23, 2017
Chris Ramsey, a physical therapist who lives in Beaverton, Oregon, is currently training for the Race Across the West, a 930-mile bike race from southern California to Colorado that begins June 13. Notably, he is believed to be the first person with MS to attempt the race solo.
Subtle symptoms add up to big problem
By Erik Robinson April 05, 2017
Elizabeth Whispell maintains an active lifestyle, so she didn’t give much thought to what seemed to be subtle changes in her appearance. It wasn’t until later that she learned she actually had a rare pituitary disorder – a condition serious enough that it ultimately required brain surgery by specialists at OHSU in Portland.
Taking on the opioid epidemic in Oregon
By Erik Robinson April 03, 2017
OHSU doctors and scientists working to address the opioid epidemic which has claimed thousands of lives and resulted in a doubling of the number of people who reported heroin addiction in a single decade, from 2003 to 2013.
New hope for treating a rare genetic disorder
By Erik Robinson March 29, 2017
Research published online in the journal Endocrinology found that a small synthetic molecule initially developed to lower cholesterol may slow or stop the devastating progression of the neurodegenerative disease adrenoleukodystrophy, or ALD. The study was conducted in a mouse model, but planning is under way for a human clinical trial.
Stem cell treatment for stroke shows promising results, study finds
By Erik Robinson March 17, 2017
Stroke medication currently available must be given within three hours to have the maximum benefit, but many patients do not make it to the hospital in time to receive it. A newly developed potential treatment involving the use of stem cells to promote brain recovery may greatly extend this window.
New genome-mapping technique opens new avenues for precision medicine
By Erik Robinson January 30, 2017
OHSU scientists have uncovered a method for quickly and efficiently mapping the genome of single cells within the body. Their findings, published Jan. 30 in the journal Nature Methods, clears the way for a significant advance in precision medicine, including cancer and many other disease areas.
A fresh outlook on life
By Erik Robinson December 29, 2016
A local woman can now to look her husband and two grown children in the eye after undergoing a successful surgery to correct a rare and debilitating spinal condition known as dropped head syndrome.
New research provides key insight about mitochondrial replacement therapy
By Erik Robinson November 30, 2016
A new discovery may unlock the answer to a vexing scientific question: How to conduct mitochondrial replacement therapy, a new gene-therapy technique, in such a way that safely prevents the transmission of harmful mitochondrial gene mutations from mothers to their children.
Kill the cancer, protect the brain
By Erik Robinson November 28, 2016
When the possibility of death is the only alternative, most people will opt for the most aggressive cancer treatments possible. The problem is, a new study by researchers at OHSU suggests that a robust combination of therapies that are effective in targeting the cancer can lead to harmful cognitive effects in the brain if the patient survives.
New technique could increase success of infertility treatment
By Erik Robinson November 10, 2016
Families struggling with infertility or a genetic predisposition for debilitating mitochondrial diseases may someday benefit from a new breakthrough led by scientists at OHSU and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.
New study raises possibility of treating disease through amniotic fluid
By Erik Robinson September 30, 2016
A breakthrough study published online this week in the journal Nucleic Acids Research suggests that it may be possible to treat genetic disease detected in the womb by safely and efficiently delivering gene-altering therapies through a kind of reverse amniocentesis.
New guidelines issued for patients with severe traumatic brain injury
By Erik Robinson September 22, 2016
A panel of leading experts today issued the 4th Edition of the Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. The updated guidelines provide recommendations for 18 monitoring and treatment topics for patients with severe traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, including surgical procedures, the use of monitors that measure intracranial pressure, preventing and treating brain swelling, and nutrition.
Study in Nature Reveals New Molecular Insight
By Erik Robinson September 14, 2016
New research reveals for the first time the atomic structures of a key molecular receptor in the brain, which opens the door for developing medications that could block activation of these receptors to address a variety of conditions, ranging from pain to high blood pressure to early formation of blood clots.
Plant-based diet reduces fatigue, weight in patients with multiple sclerosis
By Erik Robinson July 01, 2016
A first-of-its-kind controlled clinical trial found that a low-fat, plant-based diet significantly improved the health of people with multiple sclerosis by reducing both fatigue and weight. Those improvements go hand-in-hand with fighting some of the most debilitating effects of MS.